Ice sheet modelling and applications to Greenland, Antarctica and the Martian polar ice caps: Professor Ralf Greve

Ice sheet modelling and applications to Greenland, Antarctica and the Martian polar ice caps: Professor Ralf Greve

Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

ACE-CRC, Hobart (Invited Visiting Fellow)

Monday, 3 November 2014, 8:00 PM, Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania

The 2014 AIP Women in Physics Lecture Series: The search for gravitational waves - Ripples from the dark side of the Universe. Professor Sheila Rowan, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Tuesday, 21 October 2014, 8:00 PM

Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania

ABSTRACT:

Gravitational Waves are amongst the most elusive signals from our Universe reaching the earth – ‘ripples in the curvature of space-time’. The information carried by these signals will give us new insight into the hearts of some of the most violent events in the Cosmos – from black holes to the beginning of the Universe. A global network of gravitational wave detectors is in now reaching the final stages of construction, with first data expected in 2015. The nature of gravitational waves, how the detectors work and what the data from the detectors can tell us about the Universe we inhabit will be discussed.

Free Public Lecture, Hobart: A LONG TIME AGO IN GALAXIES FAR, FAR AWAY. Dr Amanda Bauer, Australian Astronomical Observatory

Tuesday 13th May 2103
Physics Lecture Theatre 1, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay

ABSTRACT:
Galaxies found in the distant, early universe look and behave differently from those in our local universe. In this lecture, I describe triumphs and tribulations towards our understanding of these changes over time, by highlighting some fundamental insights into the current mysteries of galaxy evolution, derived from telescopic observations and theoretical simulations

Free Public Lecture, Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania: Measuring the Cosmos, Professor Mark Reid

Over 2000 years ago, Hipparcus measured the distance to the Moon by triangulation from two locations across the Mediterranean Sea. However, determining distances to stars proved much more difficult. Many of the best scientists of the 16th through 18th centuries attempted to measure stellar distances, not only to determine the "scale of the cosmos" but also to test Heliocentric cosmologies. While these efforts failed, along the way they led to many discoveries. It was not until the 19th century that Bessel measured the first stellar distance.

Free Public Lecture, Hobart: BIG QUESTION, BIG FACILITIES: THE DISCOVERY OF THE ORIGIN OF MASS? , Professor Elisabetta Barberio, University of Melbourne, AIP Women in Physics Lecturer for 2013

Wednesday, 21 August 2013, 8:00 PM
Physics Lecture Theatre 1, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay

Free Public Lecture, Launceston: BIG QUESTION, BIG FACILITIES: THE DISCOVERY OF THE ORIGIN OF MASS? , Professor Elisabetta Barberio, University of Melbourne, AIP Women in Physics Lecturer for 2013

Tuesday, 20 August 2013, 5:30 PM
Rory Spence Lecture Theatre, School of Architecture & Design, Invermay Road, University of Tasmania, Inveresk Campus

Free Public Lecture: WEATHER AT THE EDGE OF SPACE: MAPPING WINDS AND TEMPERATURES IN EARTH'S AURORAL REGION by Assoc Prof Mark Conde, 18 July 2013 at 8:00 pm

As the solar wind encounters Earth's magnetic field, a portion of its energy and momentum are

extracted and "funnelled" down by the dipole field lines to meet the upper atmosphere at polar

latitudes. Here, at altitudes above 100 km (known as the thermosphere), this process drives a rich

and complex range of "weather".

Free Public Lecture: HEEDING THE WARNING OF DAEDALUS: WHATHAPPENS TO YOU IN A JET? by Dr Marc Duldig. 27 June 2013 at 8:00 pm

Daedalus warned his son Icarus not to fly too close to the sun. Is there anything in this idea? Cosmic rays are the source of increased radiation dose received by passengers and crew flying in jet aircraft (and astronauts of course) and the dose depends first on altitude and second on magnetic latitude.

NOTICE OF A FREE PUBLIC LECTURE: 28th May 2013: "Interactions between physical and biological processes in the ocean" by Dr Pete Strutton.

ABSTRACT:
Ocean phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain and produce half of Earth's oxygen. Like terrestrial plants, they require light and nutrients to grow. In the ocean, these two resources often don't co-occur, so physical processes such as mixing and advection are required to bring the two together.

Notice of a FREE PUBLIC LECTURE: "Fascinating Life Stories of Pulsars" by Professor Avinash Deshpande

ABSTRACT: Pulsars are believed to be strongly magnetized, fast rotating neutron stars with over 2000 discovered in our Galaxy so far. In the long march towards the elucidation of the mysterious ways of pulsars, a few special ones have taught us more than most of the rest put together. 8:00 pm, Tuesday 16th April 2013 in the Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania.

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